Tanks Alot

I mentioned in previous posts that Kevin has been fighting with the boat to remove a water tank.  Here’s a little of the background…

If you own a boat, you really are not happy when you are ON the water, open a hatch and find any area that should be dry to be filled with water.  Is it salt water?  Is it Fresh Water?  Where is it coming from?  How fast is it filling up?  Where else is it going? It really is a bad situation, as we know that boats should be dry on the inside, and wet only on the outside…

The lazarette (that is a storage compartment in back of the boat under the cockpit for you non-boaters) had water in it.  This area holds the water tanks, steering gear, and lots of other’stuff’.  After some heartburn, it was determined that it was FRESH water- and that is a GOOD THING because salt water would mean that it was leaking into the boat from outside.

Fresh water meant that one of the water tanks was leaking.  Not good, but better than a hole in the boat.  We have two water tanks, so we could leave one empty and still have plenty of water for our use… and we did this for last summer’s season, but this makes the boat off balance (lists) because all the weight is on the port side (left side if you are at the back looking forward, again for you non-boaters).  This winter’s goal was to remove the water tanks, figure out where the leak was, FIX IT, and of course, get to do an inspection of the entire lazarette, clean, paint, remove any un-used stuff.  Previous owners of this boat had a tendency to disconnect wires and hoses and just leave them, instead of removing them.  This drives Kevin crazy!

So, once it finally got warm enough, Kevin started disconnecting things to try and remove the starboard (leaking) water tank.  Except that it wouldn’t fit thru the hatch.  So he disconnected the steering gear and dropped the rudder.  Still wouldn’t fit.  Disconnected the port side tank and pushed it further to port.  Still no good.  Removed the angle iron bracket used for the steering gear – >NEW PROJECT< need to grind away all the rust and paint the angle iron before re-installing it… but still couldn’t maneuver the tanks out.

Figured out that port side tank had to come out first – but it wouldn’t come out either!  Quite the puzzle.  Finally figured out that the hatch was installed AFTER the tanks were put in – and the framing around the hatch opening underneath was blocking the access.

At this point, just about every tool on the boat, and quite a few from home are now out and on the boat.  Good thing we moved close- so it is only 5 miles from home!  Eventually used  a jig saw (he’s really glad he bought a battery powered one!) and a small hand saw to remove a 1″ wide section of wood (leaving at least 3″ still supporting the hatch!) and voila!  Finally able to get both tanks out – first the port, then the starboard tank.

You often see homes with cars up on blocks… have you ever seen a water tank up on blocks?  Here it is, the leaky tank!  Kevin put in some water and quickly found the leak.  Now we need to find someone who welds Stainless Steel to make the repairs.  in the meantime, the lazarette will be vacuumed, washed, inspected, painted, anything needing repairs will be taken care of, and anything that doesn’t belong in there will be removed, before re-installing the water tanks – Starboard side first, in reverse to the removal.

Lots of tools!

Lots of tools!

Lazarette hatch

Lazarette hatch

Starboard tank

Starboard tank

Removing one of them, FINALLY

Removing one of them, FINALLY

Tank on blocks

Tank on blocks

THE LEAK

THE LEAK

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